Paper Mario TTYD Stats! (The Sequel)

The new, improved Paper Mario stat sheet is here, now with heart / flower drops, item drops and drop rates, and much more!

Download the new stat spreadsheet here: Link

Explanations of the various stats in the sheet:

  • HP, ATK, DEF – Self-explanatory; based on tattle information (except in cases where it is obviously wrong like Red Spiky Buzzies).
  • EXP Level, EXP Bonus – Determine the amount of Star Points an enemy rewards. If it has a higher level than Mario, it awards (M * (EXP Level – Mario Level) + EXP Bonus) Star Points, rounded down, where M = 0.5 normally, 0.55 if there were three enemies at the start of the battle, 0.65 if there were four, and 0.75 if there were five. If its level is equal to or lower than Mario’s, it awards 0 Star Points regardless of its Bonus value.
  • Coin Base, Coin Bonus, Coin Ex% – Determine the coins an enemy drops after defeat; they drop the Base amout by default, and every additional Bonus coin has an Ex% chance of dropping.
  • HP / FP Drops – Determine the maximum number of hearts or flowers the front enemy in a battle can drop (see the link above for more details).
  • Item / Badge Drops – The items / badges an enemy can hold in-battle or randomly drop after battle, and their hold / drop weights (relative frequency of being held or dropped, with “nothing” having a hold weight of 200 and drop weight of 300). See this post for how to convert these into the absolute chance of an item drop.
  • Status Susceptibility – The likelihood of the enemy being subjected to various status ailments:
    • Sleep – Chance of being put to sleep.
    • Stop – Chance of being immobilized by a Stopwatch (Clock Out has a x1.27 multiplier to this if fully charged).
    • Dizzy – Chance of being made dizzy.
    • Confuse – Chance of being confused.
    • Burn – Chance of being burned. Is always 0 or 100+.
    • Freeze – Chance of being frozen.
    • Shrink – Chance of being shrunk.
    • Soft – Chance of being softened.
    • Fright – Chance of running away from a Fright Mask.
    • Gale – Chance of being blown away by Gale Force. Note that there is an additional factor based on the player and enemy’s relative level; for instance, a level 22 player against a Hyper Goomba (level 15) has an additional 22-15 = 7% chance of inducing the effect (assuming the chance was non-zero to begin with), and a level 10 player would have a 10-15 = -5% chance subtracted from the base chance.
    • OHKO – Chances of being defeated by Showstopper.
    • PB Cap – The “soft cap” for Power Bounce / Multibonk; i.e. the first bounce to have a 67% chance of ending the attack. The attack is forced to end at twice this number of bounces. If this value is not present, the soft cap is 9,999, which is basically infinite.
    • Dark Koopatrols seem to have a 100% susceptibility to all effects when flipped; I don’t think this applies to any other enemies, so it’s worth noting as a weird exception.

The only notable omission, which I may add at a later time, is that some Glitzville enemies have different item drop sets than their non-Glitzville counterparts; you can find those in my GameFAQs item drop guide.

That pretty much wraps up my new coverage of TTYD stuff; hope this is a good reference for aspiring badge hunters, Pre-Hooktail runners, or whomever else!

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Paper Mario TTYD: To the Victors Go the Spoils

Well, this article’s been a long time coming.

For as fleshed-out as the Thousand-Year Door’s battle system is, it’s perhaps no surprise that its battle rewards are as hard to predict as they are various. So in this post, I’ll endeavor to explain exactly how the amounts of every battle reward are determined, one by one. I know my old enemy stats guide is a little out-of-date on some of the variables that go into these calculations, so I’ll probably be updating that in the very near future.

Let’s start with the most straightforward:

Coin Drops

Whereas Paper Mario 64’s enemies each had a fixed number of coins to drop, plus some extras for the enemy in front, in TTYD, each enemy drops coins in the exact same way.

Every enemy has three variables that go into coin drop calculation: a Base amount, a Bonus amount, and an Extra Coin Drop Rate (Ex%). The drop amount starts at the Base, and each Bonus coin has an independent, Ex% chance of dropping. For example, here’s an example of how Amazy Dayzee’s (Base 5, Bonus 5, and Ex% 70) coin drops might be calculated (the number under each bonus coin is a randomly generated number from 0 to 99, and has to be less than the Ex% for its coin to be dropped):

amazy-coins

After all the coin drops are determined, the total count is multiplied by the number of Money Money badges equipped + 1. At the end of the day, the maximum number of dropped coins is 32.

HP / FP Drops

Back in my Paper Mario 64 days, these precious hearts and flowers were the most desirable of drops (to be supplanted by badges in the sequel). Though it was far from a guarantee, it always seemed to me that taking damage, or using a ton of FP in-battle would slightly increase the amount of HP and FP I earned. Turns out in TTYD, this isn’t at all far from the truth, and in fact, it’s much simpler than that – the chances of HP / FP drops are directly tied to Mario’s current percentage of his max HP / FP:

Current HP/FP Percentage Overall HP Drop Rate Individual HP Drop Rate Overall FP Drop Rate Individual FP Drop Rate
Up to 20% 70% 50% 40% 40%
Up to 30% 60% 50% 40% 40%
Up to 50% 50% 40% 40% 40%
Up to 80% 40% 40% 40% 40%
More than 80% 30% 30% 30% 40%

So say that Mario ends a battle with 3 / 10 HP and 6 / 10 FP:

  • First, the game checks to see if any HP should drop at all (60% chance);
  • If it does, then the game checks M times to see if it should drop a single heart (50% each).
  • Next, the game checks to see if any FP should drop at all (40% chance);
  • If it does, then the game checks N times to see if it should drop a single flower (40% each)…

where M and N are determined by the type of enemy leading the battle, and can range from 2 to 6. For example, most early-game enemies have (2,2), Spiky Parabuzzies have (4, 2), X-Nauts PhD have (2, 4), and Elite Wizzerds have a whopping (5, 5). Needless to say, those constants will be in the next version of my TTYD enemy stats guide.

After those HP / FP drops are determined, if Mario has any Heart Finder badges on, the game adds some random additional heart drops – 1 to 3 of them if one badge, or 1 to N+3 of them if more than one. Likewise, Flower Finder will grant equivalent bonus FP drops. Both heart and flower drops cap at 32 apiece, just like coins. (Although you’d have to have a ridiculous number of Finder badges to exceed that!)

And now for the main event:

Item / Badge Drops

Back in 2011, I uploaded a guide to GameFAQs that contains the drop tables of every enemy in the game. Although these tables had some numbers alongside them, I could only proffer some vague speculation as to how those translated into their actual drop rates. Fast-forward to April 2016 and the discovery of Palace Skip; I finally had an excuse to get my hands dirty in assembly code again, and I successfully figured out everything that goes into these calculations! Here’s the dirt…

Item Hold Chances

The first thing to find out is how likely enemies are to hold items in battle, since those are observably a ton more likely than random drops. For the rest of this section, we’ll look at Crazee Dayzee’s drops as an example (for no particular reason, other than 900 failed attempts at getting a Flower Saver drop…)

crazee-drops

These are all the items Crazee Dayzees can hold / drop, with their respective hold / drop weights. Anything without a hold weight indicated actually has a hold weight of 0.

Upon determining an enemy’s held item, it basically chooses between all the options at their respective weights, with an additional weight of 200 for no item at all. Practically, this means that the chance of a particular item being held is its hold weight divided by (200 + the sum of all items’ hold weights). For example, a Super Shroom has a 10 / (200 + 10 + 10) = 1/22 chance of being held by a Crazee Dayzee.

This same function is used when determining what item Ms. Mowz steals from an enemy with no held item, only with her stealing a coin in the case of no item being chosen, rather than nothing. (Notably, if she would normally steal an item / badge, but Mario’s item / badge inventory is full, she misses the enemy rather than stealing a coin.)

All held items being determined, here’s what happens at the end of a battle:

Drop Type Determination

There are three things that can happen at the end of a battle – the game can try to roll for a random item from the front enemy (henceforth, “random drop”), drop an enemy’s held item (“held drop”), or drop nothing at all. The chances of these events happening are weighted as follows:

item-weights-0

If Mario has Item Hog badges equipped, this adds an additional “weight” per badge equipped to the random and held drop cases:

…and so forth. As the number of Item Hog badges increases, the chances of the Random / Held drop cases approach 50%; however, their effect visibly has pretty sharply diminishing returns after the first couple of badges.

EDIT (2017-09-06): The 25%/25%/50% (1:1:2) weights are true for most battles in the game, but apparently battles in the Pit of 100 Trials use a 20%/20%/60% (1:1:3) weighting instead, making item drops overall less likely.  Think of that as adding an additional bar to the “None” stack, if you like.

Here’s a breakdown of what happens in each of these cases:

Random Drop

So you’re lucky enough to get a shot at a random item drop! Don’t celebrate just yet though, because the odds are stacked further against you. Similarly to the formula for determining held item chances, the chance of an item being randomly dropped is its drop weight divided by (300(!) + the sum of all items’ drop weights).

For example, the chance of a Crazee Dayzee dropping a Point Swap would be a none-too-great 15 / (300 + 10 + 10 + 10 + 15 + 10 + 2 + 1 + 1) = 15/359 ≈ 1/24, and the chance of a Flower Saver drop is a mere 1/359!  Taking into account the 25% chance of getting the “Random Drop” case to begin with (or 33.3% with an Item Hog badge), that chance plummets to an abysmal 1/1,436! (or 1/1,077 with an Item Hog.) Blech…

To reiterate, only the front enemy in a battle can drop items this way, so unfortunately you won’t be getting any Amazy Dayzee random drops.

Held Drop

Things are far brighter for this case; you simply get one of the items that were held by the enemies at the start of the battle (excluding ones you stole with Kiss Thief, you monster). If there aren’t any items to be dropped this way, you’re out of luck. However, if that’s the case when you have at least one Item Hog badge equipped, you have a 50% chance of picking up one of the following items at random:

item-hog-list

Yes, Dried Shrooms are three times as likely to drop; in fact, factoring in the chance of the “Held Drop” case being chosen, with one Item Hog, your total chances of getting a Dried Shroom from a battle with no enemy held items are a none-too-shabby 33.3% * 50% * 30% = 5%. Rejoice in that, Mega-Rush-P-using Pre-Hooktail-Pit-Runners!

No Drop

You don’t get an item drop in this case. Thought that’d be self-explanatory…

Final Thoughts

And finally, that wraps everything up! Again, I’m hoping to compile all the drop tables, HP / FP drops, and existing enemy stat info into a single doc in the near future. In the meantime, enjoy your well-earned rewards (and revel in your RNG fortune if you manage to get any of the rarer badges!)

Oh, one more note about item / badge drops; if you scare all the enemies in a battle away with Fright Masks, items can still be dropped in the same way as always. This could be potentially useful for enemies with really high susceptibility to Fright (e.g. Dayzees – 100%!) Who knows?

Paper Mario TTYD: No Holds Barred

Hey, long time with no updates, but I’m back, bearing more Paper Mario: TTYD badgey goodness! Before getting to the real skinny (actual drop / hold rates, rather than baseless speculation), I thought I’d do a short bit on messing around with enemies’ held items.

Interestingly, even though the enemies’ drop tables prevent too many weird / useless held and dropped items, the game actually has a failsafe to prevent enemies from holding anything but one of these 32 items, using internal item IDs 0x80 – 0xA0 (128 – 160):

enemy-items-ok.png

Astute readers might have noticed that’s actually a range of 33 IDs rather than 32; the one in that range that isn’t allowed is “Trade Off”, a dummied-out item that raises the EXP of enemies. Some of the items that are allowed seem a bit odd; enemies have no use for the FP-restoring items, and they don’t seem to be programmed to use the Hot Dog, or the unused Cake item (restores 10 HP) either. Still, they are completely capable of holding these items in-battle:

enemy-held-items-totally-normal.PNG

Also notably, this list does exclude some in-battle items that one might consider “normal”, but for usually understandable reasons:

  • Point Swap: Can’t have enemies swapping their HP with nonexistent FP, after all.
  • Fright Mask: Although it would be humorous if enemies could force Mario to run away from battle, I can imagine why this doesn’t work.
  • Mystery?: Not really sure, as I never used this item much myself. Maybe some of the effects wouldn’t work properly on enemies.
  • Spite Pouch: Interestingly, this one is programmed into some enemies’ drop tables, but cannot in fact be held.  I suspect this is because the Counter status was never programmed properly for some enemies / attacks; more on that later…
  • Gold Bars: Yeah, you wish.

Weirdly, unlike items, not only is there nothing preventing enemies from holding arbitrary badges, a good number of them that can’t normally be held do in fact work, at least to some extent:

  • All or Nothing: Gives the enemy +1 Attack (apparently they know about Timed Hits!)
  • Feeling Fine: Works as advertised. Presumably not used since Mario wouldn’t have any use for a second one.
  • Zap Tap: Same deal. Rather obnoxious to deal with, too.
  • Lucky Day: Works, rather unsurprisingly. Pretty Lucky is objectively better anyway, though…
  • Double Pain: Works, and is in fact stackable. Yeesh.
  • Happy Flower, Pity Flower: Shows visible FP gain, though it doesn’t seem to do anything.
  • HP Drain, FP Drain: These don’t really work; they do lower the enemy’s Attack by 1, though.
  • Lucky Start: Humorously, works exactly as it does for Mario:

enemy-held-badges-all-the-fp

 

(Not so lucky in that case, bud…)

Finally, Return Postage does grant the Counter status, but with some… interesting side effects for some moves…

enemy-return-postage-mowz-2

Uhh…

enemy-return-postage-mowz-4

Right.

If you want to see some of these crazy badges in action, check out MilesLuigi’s video of most of the effects!

Tune in again soon, where I detail how to calculate item drop rates exactly, as well as explaining the rest of after-battle rewards in depth!

Super Smash Bros. 4 Equipment – All the RNG!

So, I was totally fed up with dealing with huge variance in Super Smash Bros. 4’s much-maligned custom equipment drops. Clearly data-mining held some answers, and in either case, I had 2000+ pieces of equipment (most from an ongoing quest to get a Critical Hitter Brawn Badge from Smash Wii U’s Crazy Orders) to back my findings.  And for the most point, I pretty much got what I was looking for; here’s the process the game uses to generate random equipment, as far as I can tell:

  • A positive stat value is determined from 10 to 85. Based on this number, the item is given a tier ranging from 1-7 (see the table below for details).
  • A negative stat value is determined, which ranges from 50 to 70% of the positive stat’s value.
  • If the equipment has a helpful (“positive”) bonus effect, subtract its effect’s stat modifier (see the table below for these values) from the previously generated positive stat; likewise, if it has a harmful (“negative”) effect, subtract its effect’s stat modifier from the previously generated negative stat.
  • After these calculations, any equipment generated will not have either stat with a value below 5.
  • “Generic” badges (Brawn, Protection, Agility) have both stats multiplied by 0.72.
  • Both stats are rounded down, if necessary.

Additionally, the sell price of equipment is pretty simply calculable by the following formula: (1.0p - 0.6n + 1.1pb - 0.4nb) * t, with the variables representing the following quantities:

  • p = Positive stat
  • n = Negative stat
  • pb = Positive stat modifier, if equipment has a positive bonus effect
  • nb = Negative stat modifier, if equipment has a negative bonus effect
  • t = Price multiplier based on item’s tier (see table below)

Here’s a table determining what tiers correspond to what ranges of stats:

Tier Positive Range* Negative Range* Price Multiplier Equipment Class
1 10 – 20 5 – 14 0.36 Normal
2 21 – 30 10 – 21 0.58 Normal
3 31 – 40 15 – 28 0.97 Super
4 41 – 50 20 – 35 1.22 Super
5 51 – 60 25 – 42 1.35 Super
6 61 – 70 30 – 49 1.44 Rare
7 71 – 85 35 – 59 1.71 Rare

* Before applying effects’ stat modifiers or “generic badge” modifier.

As an aside, the fact that the sell price formula uses the final stats, but the sell price tier of the original positive value before any modification, means that two generic badges on the Tier 4-5 or 5-6 boundary can have the same stats, but differing sell prices. For example, two Super Brawn Badges with (+36, -20) that started out as (+50, -28) and (+51, -28) would sell for 29G and 32G, respectively.

Finally, here’s a table of all of the bonus effects and their associated stat modifiers (negative / red ones signify negative effects, but the modifiers should be considered as positive values). For reference, I’ve also included the best possible stats for generic and non-generic badges with the highest positive stat for each effect:

Effect Name Stat Modifier Best Non-Generic Best Generic
Sprinter 25 +60, -42 +43, -30
Stroller -30 +85, -12 +61, -8
Glider 25 +60, -42 +43, -30
Antiglide -38 +85, -5 +61, -3
Leaper 34 +51, -42 +36, -30
Antileap -36 +85, -6 +61, -4
Speed Skater 34 +51, -42 +36, -30
Hi-Jump 27 +58, -42 +41, -30
Lo-Jump -35 +85, -7 +61, -5
Double-Jump Boost 34 +51, -42 +36, -30
Double-Jump Drag -43 +85, -5 +61, -3
Thistle Jump 19 +66, -42 +47, -30
Anchor Jump -43 +85, -5 +61, -3
Speed Walker 12 +73, -42 +52, -30
Meanderer -8 +85, -34 +61, -24
Lingering Edge 10 +75, -42 +54, -30
Hasty Edge -5 +85, -37 +61, -26
Gluey Edge 27 +58, -42 +41, -30
Tough Edge -32 +85, -10 +61, -7
Hard Braker 5 +80, -42 +57, -30
Perfect-Shield Helper 40 +45, -42 +32, -30
Imperfect Shield -35 +85, -7 +61, -5
Shield Regenerator 21 +64, -42 +46, -30
Shield Degenerator -22 +85, -20 +61, -14
Air Defender 27 +58, -42 +41, -30
Air Piñata -38 +85, -5 +61, -3
Nimble Dodger 22 +63, -42 +45, -30
Dodgy Dodger -33 +85, -9 +61, -6
Smooth Lander 33 +52, -42 +37, -30
Crash Lander -36 +85, -6 +61, -4
Quick Smasher 28 +57, -42 +41, -30
Hyper Smasher 29 +56, -42 +40, -30
Air Attacker 15 +70, -42 +50, -30
Air Scrapper -35 +85, -7 +61, -5
Meteor Master 40 +45, -42 +32, -30
Desperate Attacker 27 +58, -42 +41, -30
Desperate Defender 18 +67, -42 +48, -30
Desperate Speedster 20 +65, -42 +46, -30
Desperate Specialist 33 +52, -42 +37, -30
Desperate Immortal 36 +49, -42 +35, -30
Unharmed Attacker 24 +61, -42 +43, -30
Unharmed Speedster 8 +77, -42 +55, -30
Unharmed Speed Demon 26 +59, -42 +42, -30
Trade-off Attacker 16 +69, -42 +49, -30
Trade-off Defender 25 +60, -42 +43, -30
Trade-off Speedster 21 +64, -42 +46, -30
All-around Trade-off 27 +58, -42 +41, -30
Moon Launcher 29 +56, -42 +40, -30
Vampire 43 +42, -42 +30, -30
No-Flinch Smasher 30 +55, -42 +39, -30
Critical Hitter 58 +27, -42 +19, -30
Insult to Injury 25 +60, -42 +43, -30
First Striker 9 +76, -42 +54, -30
Countdown 23 +62, -42 +44, -30
Speed Crasher 27 +58, -42 +41, -30
Shield Exploder 30 +55, -42 +39, -30
Shield Healer 33 +52, -42 +37, -30
Shield Reflector 15 +70, -42 +50, -30
Escape Artist 18 +67, -42 +48, -30
Item Hurler 40 +45, -42 +32, -30
Item Lobber -21 +85, -21 +61, -15
Item Hitter 35 +50, -42 +36, -30
Item Pitcher 15 +70, -42 +50, -30
Item Shooter 33 +52, -42 +37, -30
Quick Batter 26 +59, -42 +42, -30
Star Rod 12 +73, -42 +52, -30
Lip’s Stick 11 +74, -42 +53, -30
Super Scope 14 +71, -42 +51, -30
Ray Gun 14 +71, -42 +51, -30
Fire Flower 6 +79, -42 +56, -30
Beam Sword 12 +73, -42 +52, -30
Home-Run Bat 22 +63, -42 +45, -30
Bob-omb 12 +73, -42 +52, -30
Mr. Saturn 4 +81, -42 +58, -30
Food Lover 17 +68, -42 +48, -30
Picky Eater -7 +85, -35 +61, -25
Crouch Healer 30 +55, -42 +39, -30
Caloric Attacker 26 +59, -42 +42, -30
Caloric Speedster 16 +69, -42 +49, -30
Caloric Defender 16 +69, -42 +49, -30
Caloric Powerhouse 27 +58, -42 +41, -30
KO Healer 22 +63, -42 +45, -30
Caloric Immortal 32 +53, -42 +38, -30
Auto-Healer 42 +43, -42 +30, -30
Smash Ball Attractor 16 +69, -42 +49, -30
Pity Final Smasher 5 +80, -42 +57, -30
Smash Ball Clinger 6 +79, -42 +56, -30
Super Final Smasher 20 +65, -42 +46, -30
Final Smash Healer 16 +69, -42 +49, -30
Double Final Smasher 23 +62, -42 +44, -30
Sudden Death Gambler 16 +69, -42 +49, -30
Safe Respawner 28 +57, -42 +41, -30
Risky Respawner -33 +85, -9 +61, -6

As a side note, the stats of equipment obtained from challenges and such are fixed, and do not necessarily follow the same rules as random drops. Notably, the Critical Hitter Brawn Badge received as a reward for getting 300 KO’s in Super Smash Bros. 3DS has +7 Attack, -40 Defense, which is impossibly bad for a random generic Critical Hitter equipment (the negative range for +7 Attack would normally range from -24 to -34 Defense). So that’s a bit of a pain.

Smash Run – Not Kirby Air Ride 2, but meh, close enough.

So I’ve been playing a bunch of Super Smash Bros. for 3DS’s single player recently, for the first time in a while, and naturally I’ve been doing some data-mining. In light of that, here’s a list of all of the Smash Run enemies’ stat drops.

The types of patch dropped are based on a weighted distribution unique to each enemy type. By default, normal stats have a weight of 10; stats in the “stat strengths” section have a weight of 100 instead, and if All is in the section, it has a weight of 10 rather than the default of 0.  The “stat points” is the approximate range of the total worth of the patches dropped (with All counting only for how many points it grants to a single stat, not all six); individual patches come in fixed size increments, worth 3, 10, 30, 100, or 200 points. After the halfway point of a run, this amount is cut in half for all enemies (except Souflees and Clubberskulls, which always drop max-sized stat boosts).

Name Series Patches Stat Pts1 Stat Strengths
Goomba Mario 3 15 – 20 Speed Attack Arms
Shy Guy Mario 3 15 – 20 Speed JumpSpecialDefense2
Bullet Bill Mario 3 15 – 20 Jump Attack Arms
Spike Top Mario 3 15 – 20 Speed Attack Defense
Koopa Mario 3 45 – 60 Speed Jump Attack Arms
Flame Chomp Mario 5 45 – 60 Jump Special Arms
Hammer Bro Mario 5 60 – 80  Jump Special Arms
Lakitu Mario 5 60 – 80  JumpArms
Spiny Mario 0 0  No Stats
Magikoopa Mario 5 100 – 125  JumpSpecial Arms
Banzai Bill Mario 7 90 – 120 Jump Attack Defense
Grand Goomba Mario 7 90 – 120 Speed AttackDefense
Tikibuzz Donkey Kong 3 15 – 20 Jump Attack Arms
Kritter Donkey Kong 5 60 – 80 Speed Attack Arms
Octorok Zelda 3 15 – 20 Speed Special Arms
Bubble Zelda 5 35 – 70 Jump Attack Special Defense
Peahat Zelda 5 45 – 60 Jump Attack Special Defense
Redead Zelda 5 60 – 80 Speed Attack Special Defense
Stalfos Zelda 5 90 – 120 Speed Attack Defense
Geemer Metroid 3 15 – 20 Speed Attack
Reo Metroid 5 30 – 40 Jump Attack Defense
Kihunter Metroid 3 45 – 60 Jump Attack Special Arms
Waddle Dee Kirby 3 15 – 20 Speed Jump Arms
Bronto Burt Kirby 3 15 – 20 Jump Attack Arms
Tac Kirby 3 15 – 20 Speed Jump Attack Special Arms
Waddle Doo Kirby 3 30 – 40 Speed Special Arms
Plasma Wisp Kirby 3 30 – 40  Jump Special Arms
Gordo Kirby 0 0  No Stats
Shotzo Kirby 0 0  No Stats
Petilil Pokémon 3 15 – 20 Speed Special Arms
Gastly Pokémon 3 20 – 25 Jump Attack Defense
Koffing Pokémon 3 20 – 25 Jump Special Arms
Cryogonal Pokémon 3 30 – 40 Jump Special Arms
Chandelure Pokémon 5 45 – 60 Jump Special Arms
Starman EarthBound 5 60 – 80 Special Arms
Monoeye Kid Icarus 3 15 – 20 Jump Special Arms
Nutski Kid Icarus 3 15 – 20 Jump Special Arms
Bumpety Bomb Kid Icarus 5 30 – 40 Speed Special Defense
Daphne Kid Icarus 3 30 – 40 Jump Special Arms
Lethinium Kid Icarus 3 30 – 40 Special Defense
Mahva Kid Icarus 5 30 – 40 Jump Defense
Zuree Kid Icarus 5 40 – 50 Jump Attack Defense
Flage Kid Icarus 5 40 – 50 Jump Attack Defense
Skuttler Kid Icarus 5 45 – 60 Speed Attack Arms
Skuttler Cannoneer Kid Icarus 5 45 – 60 Speed Special Arms
Skuttler Mage Kid Icarus 5 100 – 125 Speed Special Arms Defense
Ghost Find Mii 3 15 – 20 Jump Arms
Eggrobo Sonic 5 30 – 40 Jump Special Arms
Met Mega Man 3 15 – 20 Special Defense
Pooka Namco 5 45 – 60 Speed Jump Attack Defense
Bacura Namco 0 0   No Stats
Mite Smash Bros. 1 10 Speed Jump Attack Arms
Glunder Smash Bros. 3 15 – 20 Speed Special Defense
Glice Smash Bros. 3 45 – 60 Speed Special Defense
Glire Smash Bros. 3 60 – 80 Speed Special Defense
Roturret Smash Bros. 7 75 – 100 Special Defense
Chain Chomp Mario 7 150 – 200 Speed Attack Defense All
Darknut Zelda 7 450 – 600 Speed Attack Defense All
Metroid Metroid 5 150 – 200 Jump Attack Defense All
Bonkers Kirby 7 450 – 600 Speed Attack Special Arms Defense All
Devil Car EarthBound 7 300 – 400 Speed Attack Defense All
Polar Bear Ice Climber 7 300 – 400 Speed Jump Special Arms Defense All
Megonta Kid Icarus 5 150 – 200 Speed Attack Special Defense All
Boom Stomper Kid Icarus 7 225 – 300 Speed Attack Defense
Reaper Kid Icarus 7 300 – 400 Speed Attack Arms Defense All
Mimicutie Kid Icarus 7 300 – 400 Speed Attack Defense All
Lurchthorn Kid Icarus 3 150 – 200 Jump Special Arms All
Clubberskull Kid Icarus 3 MAX Speed Attack Defense
Bulborb Pikmin 7 375 – 500 Speed Attack Defense All
Fly Guy Yoshi’s Island 0 0  No Stats
Souflee Kid Icarus 1 MAX Speed Jump Attack Special Arms Defense
Glint Beetle Pikmin 0 0  No Stats
Sneaky Spirit Rhythm Heaven 3 36 All3
Poppant Smash Bros. 0 0  No Stats
Orne Kid Icarus 0 0  No Stats
Bill Blaster Mario 5 ???4 Speed Jump Attack Special Arms Defense
Generator Smash Bros. 5 ???4 Speed Jump Attack Special Arms Defense


Footnotes:
1. In-game data stat range. In practice, stats can vary a little bit outside of this range; for instance, enemies with a “15 – 20” range can drop either 16 or 23 points’ worth of patches.
2. Only the color matching the color of the Shy Guy has a value of 100.
3. Sneaky Spirits only give All patches.
4. In practice, this stat range is all over the place and doesn’t match up with the game values at all; I’ve seen them drop from as low as 50 to over 150.

Kart/Character Stats, MKWii Edition

Prior to my work on this, and pretty much still now, Ark42’s Mario Kart Wii stat guide has been the go-to source for MKW stats.  While I appreciate how soon his guide went up after the game came out, I can only assume he measured the bars shown on the kart select screen, which aren’t particularly accurate, and used some inconsistent rounding to get the “values out of 80” in the guide.  In short, they’re pretty inaccurate; in particular, the Drift values on the kart select screen are all over the map compared to the karts’ actual stats; the Dolphin Dasher has a better-than-average Drift stat, despite what the game’s bars would suggest.  Furthermore, his guide’s values for character bonuses are considerably more varied than those in the actual game; in particular, Funky Kong’s speed bonus is a fair amount more than Large Mii’s or Rosalina’s.  However, the game data actually contains some pretty easily crackable tables of attributes for both the characters and the karts, and like Mario Kart DS, it includes a handful of other stats that aren’t shown in the game.

Conveniently enough, the Top Speed, Off-Road, Mini-Turbo, and Weight values for karts are all based on twenty different, pretty much equally spaced values, so I decided to adapt a twenty-point system for the other stats, as well.  The characters’ stat bonuses are always in one of two distinct tiers (three for Weight), but the effectiveness varies a lot by the stat; a weak boost in Acceleration is worth a mere 0.6 kart points, but a weak boost in Mini-Turbo is worth a whopping 3.0 kart points!  As such, the bars on the kart selection screen clearly don’t accurately reflect the worth of the bonuses.

Here’s a table of the stats, with vehicles arranged by weight class and by “build”, or the general distribution of stats compared to the average.  Note that the Miis’ actual stats aren’t what are listed in the table, likely due to some coding error; Large Mii actually has Medium Mii’s stats, Medium Mii has Small Mii’s, and Small Mii has Rosalina’s, for whatever reason.

Image

A brief description of the stats and builds:

  • Weight Class (WC): Small, Medium, or Large; this dictates the kart’s rough weight and which characters are able to drive it.
  • Vehicle Type (VT): Kart or Bike. Only karts are able to do double (red) mini-turbos, and only bikes are able to do wheelies. There’s a significant difference in playstyle between them, and each have a large following in pro circles.
  • Build: A catchy name I came up with that describes the stats of the vehicle at a glance. More on this further on.
  • Drift Type (DT): The new, “Inward”-drifting bikes take turns much more sharply than “Outward”-drifting vehicles.
  • Weight (WT): Controls the physics of bouncing, tricks, and bumping into other vehicles.
  • Speed (SP): Dictates the maximum speed your vehicle can reach.
  • Turn Speed (TS): A completely hidden stat that determines how much speed you lose while turning without drifting.
  • Acceleration (AC): Determines how fast your vehicle gets up to speed. I graded it on a basis of going from 0-60kph (top speeds in kph are listed below).
  • Handling (HN): How quickly your vehicle turns without drifting.
  • Drift (DR): How sharply your vehicle turns while drifting and holding into the turn.
  • Off-Road (OR): A higher stat makes you lose less speed while off-road.
  • Mini-Turbo (MT): Controls how long your speed boost lasts while getting a Mini-Turbo from a drift. This does not affect the boost you get from a standstill Mini-Turbo in any way.

Builds:

  • All-around: As the name suggests, All-around vehicles have balanced stats. These vehicles include all of the standard karts/bikes, as well as the Piranha Prowler. Similar stat classes are the Off-Roaders and the Drifters.
  • Charger: These vehicles have the highest acceleration, and good increases in handling and drift. In exchange, they lose a good amount of speed and turn speed. The Slow class is fairly similar.
  • Slow: These vehicles have massive reductions in speed and poorer drift than average, but have greatly raised stats in everything else. The Charger class is similar to this, and this is pretty much the opposite of the Mach and Fast classes.
  • Off-Roader: These vehicles are fairly average in most stats, but have a much higher off-road stat than usual. In exchange, the drift and mini-turbo stats are slightly lower than average. The Drifter class is an almost direct opposite of this class.
  • Drifter: This class comprises only two vehicles, but they share the distinction of having greatly increased Drift and Mini-Turbo, in exchange for slightly lower off-road and other stats.
  • Mach: Widely regarded as one of the best classes, these vehicles have greatly increased Speed, Drift, and Mini-Turbo, but sizable reductions in everything else.
  • Fast: These power-packed vehicles are designed only for speed, at the cost of six- or seven- point reductions in everything but acceleration. Although the Jet Bubble’s speed is clearly sub-par, it made the list because it has all the characteristic downsides of a Fast vehicle (just without the super speed).

Finally, here’s a table summing up the actual stat values for some stats based on the 20-point system (with weak/strong bonuses at the bottom):

  • Speed: Measured in kilometers per hour, these are the exact top speeds that correspond to the stats in the charts above.  Ranges from 75-86 kph for karts alone.
  • Acceleration: The approximate time, in seconds, it takes a kart to accelerate from 0 to 60kph; ranges from 4 seconds to just under 1 second for karts alone.
  • Offroad Multipliers: How much of your top speed you retain while driving over various terrains. In addition, you can only get Mini-Turbos off-road if this value is .5500 or higher for the type of terrain you’re driving on.
    Offroad 1 – Thick offroad areas, such as the pink snow in DK Summit, dark sand in Desert Hills, etc. Ranges from 0.185 to 0.400 for karts alone.
    Offroad 2 – Most standard offroad areas, including practically all grass. You can still drift in this terrain with a total Offroad stat of 14 or higher. Ranges from 0.325 to 0.675 for karts alone.
    Offroad 3 – Shy Guy Beach’s water, and the rocks on the sides of Grumble Volcano, Moonview Highway, and Koopa Cape. Ranges from 0.550 to 0.875 for karts alone; a strong bonus can push the max up to nearly 0.900.
    Offroad 4 – Just used in Sherbet Land, everywhere excepting the cave. DS Desert Hills is not offroad, contrary to popular belief. Ranges from 0.881 to 0.989 for karts alone, and a strong bonus can get it up to an even 1.000.
  • Mini-Turbo: The duration of a blue Mini-Turbo boost, in sixtieths of a second; ranges from 1/4 to 2/3 of a second for karts alone. Red mini-turbo boosts always last exactly three times as long as blue ones.

Turn Speed, Handling and Drift aren’t on the chart since the values I got weren’t too exact, and Weight’s, understandably, pretty difficult to quantify.

Stat SP AC OR1 OR2 OR3 OR4 MT
1 75.00 4.00 .1850 .3250 .5500 .8810 15
2 75.53 3.71 .1963 .3434 .5671 .8866 16
3 76.06 3.43 .2076 .3618 .5842 .8921 18
4 76.59 3.17 .2189 .3802 .6013 .8977 19
5 77.12 2.94 .2302 .3986 .6184 .9032 20
6 77.65 2.72 .2415 .4170 .6355 .9088 22
7 78.18 2.52 .2528 .4354 .6526 .9144 23
8 78.71 2.33 .2641 .4538 .6697 .9199 24
9 79.24 2.16 .2754 .4722 .6868 .9255 26
10 79.77 2.00 .2867 .4906 .7039 .9310 27
11 80.30 1.85 .2980 .5090 .7210 .9366 28
12 80.83 1.71 .3093 .5274 .7381 .9422 29
13 81.36 1.58 .3206 .5458 .7552 .9477 31
14 81.89 1.46 .3319 .5642 .7723 .9533 32
15 82.42 1.35 .3432 .5826 .7894 .9588 33
16 82.95 1.25 .3545 .6010 .8065 .9644 35
17 83.48 1.16 .3658 .6194 .8236 .9700 36
18 84.01 1.07 .3771 .6378 .8407 .9755 37
19 84.54 0.99 .3884 .6562 .8578 .9811 39
20 85.07 0.92 .3997 .6746 .8749 .9866 40
Weak +0.53 -5% +.0171 +.0184 +.0113 +.0064 +4
Strong +1.06 -10% +.0342 +.0368 +.0226 +.0128 +8

For further reading on these stats, you can check out my FAQ on the subject on GameFAQs; it also has a lot of useful notes on item probabilities, which were also taken directly from the game data.  There’s even charts for probabilities of CPU-controlled karts getting items; you might be surprised at some of the differences (for instance, they can never get triple red shells).